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Friday, January 27, 2012

No Knead Bread....

 
Baking home made bread is something I wish I had more time for.  I would love nothing more than to make all our own bread.  Working full time makes the desire for fresh baked bread very difficult. You can imagine how thrilled I was when this turned out to be so easy, even for a workday.
I found this recipe on a blog and bookmarked the web site she had sited for the recipe.  I'm embarrassed to say I don't remember what blog it was from.  Don't let the lengthy instructions scare you. They couldn't be any easier. The recipe comes right from the King Arthur web site.

 Ingredients
  • 3 cups lukewarm water
  • 6 1/2 to 7 1/2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons instant yeast


Directions

*The flour/liquid ratio is important in this recipe. If you measure flour by sprinkling it into your measuring cup, then gently sweeping off the excess, use 7 1/2 cups. If you measure flour by dipping your cup into the canister, then sweeping off the excess, use 6 1/2 cups. Most accurate of all, and guaranteed to give you the best results, if you measure flour by weight, use 32 ounces.
1) Combine all of the ingredients in a large mixing bowl, or a large (6-quart), food-safe plastic bucket. For first-timers, "lukewarm" means about 105°F, but don't stress over getting the temperatures exact here. Comfortably warm is fine; "OUCH, that's hot!" is not. Yeast is a living thing; treat it nicely.
2) Mix and stir everything together to make a very sticky, rough dough. If you have a stand mixer, beat at medium speed with the beater blade for 30 to 60 seconds. If you don't have a mixer, just stir-stir-stir with a big spoon or dough whisk till everything is combined.
3) Next, you're going to let the dough rise. If you've made the dough in a plastic bucket, you're all set — just let it stay there, covering the bucket with a lid or plastic wrap; a shower cap actually works well here. If you've made the dough in a bowl that's not at least 6-quart capacity, transfer it to a large bowl; it's going to rise a lot. There's no need to grease the bowl, though you can if you like; it makes it a bit easier to get the dough out when it's time to bake bread.
4) Cover the bowl or bucket, and let the dough rise at room temperature for 2 hours. Then refrigerate it for at least 2 hours, or for up to about 7 days. (If you're pressed for time, skip the room-temperature rise, and stick it right into the fridge). The longer you keep it in the fridge, the tangier it'll get; if you chill it for 7 days, it will taste like sourdough. Over the course of the first day or so, it'll rise, then fall. That's OK; that's what it's supposed to do.
5) When you're ready to make bread, sprinkle the top of the dough with flour; this will make it easier to grab a hunk. Grease your hands, and pull off about 1/4 to 1/3 of the dough — a 14-ounce to 19-ounce piece, if you have a scale. It'll be about the size of a softball, or a large grapefruit.
6) Plop the sticky dough onto a floured work surface, and round it into a ball, or a longer log. Don't fuss around trying to make it perfect; just do the best you can.
7) Place the dough on a piece of parchment (if you're going to use a baking stone); or onto a lightly greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Sift a light coating of flour over the top; this will help keep the dough moist as it rests before baking.
8) Let the dough rise for about 45 to 60 minutes. It won't appear to rise upwards that much; rather, it'll seem to settle and expand. Preheat your oven (and baking stone, if you're using one) to 450°F while the dough rests. Place a shallow metal or cast iron pan (not glass, Pyrex, or ceramic) on the lowest oven rack, and have 1 cup of hot water ready to go.
9) When you're ready to bake, take a sharp knife and slash the bread 2 or 3 times, making a cut about 1/2" deep. The bread may deflate a bit; that's OK, it'll pick right up in the hot oven.
10) Place the bread in the oven, and carefully pour the 1 cup hot water into the shallow pan on the rack beneath. It'll bubble and steam; close the oven door quickly.
11) Bake the bread for 25 to 35 minutes, until it's a deep, golden brown.
12) Remove the bread from the oven, and cool it on a rack. Store leftover bread in a plastic bag at room temperature.
13) Yield: 3 or 4 loaves, depending on size.

One of my sons wondered what bakery it came from.  How is that for a compliment?  The crust was crispy and the inside had enough holes to make it similar to a Tuscan Bread,  The next batch of dough will stay in the fridge for three days to see if it will taste more like a sour dough.  

43 comments:

  1. It looks so good. I would love a warm slice, slathered with butter! Bet your house smelled good :)

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  2. Oh WOW, that bread looks fabulous. Great job. I'm going to have to give that one a try. I always use King Arthur Flour, too. It's the best. Take care. Susan

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  3. So beautiful! I've been wanting to try this method for a while now, and your gorgeous loaf is sending me in that direction. It really does look like it came from a bakery, but I bet it's even better since it was made at home. :)

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  4. I've always wanted to make my own bread, but thought it would be too complicated. This looks delicious and since you said it's pretty easy, I'll give it a try!

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  5. A truly beautiful loaf!!

    Blessings, Debbie

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  6. isn't it amazing!! I discovered the no knead method about 4 months ago and i have never looked back... it creates bread that people think is shop bought from an artisan bakery!!!... I love it... and yours really does look incredible!

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  7. This looks wonderful. I saw that post too. Have no idea where but I am going to bookmark this!

    Carol

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  8. This is the best bread! I also add my favorite fresh of dried herbs sometimes. Better than bakery.

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  9. I bought the book Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes A Day years ago and haven't stopped making it! You might want to look into it, they have many variations and The Challah is amazing-have fun:@)

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  10. Can't wait to try this;I have been wondering about this recipe for a long time; Thanks so much for this post; your bread looks wonderful and so is your son. I pinned it.
    Rita

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  11. That looks really good!
    I'm intrigued by this recipe so I've bookmarked it to come back to.
    Thanks for posting it. It does look like its from a bakery! Your son's right :))

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  12. What a gorgeous loaf...I've never tried the no knead breads but I hear they're great. I'm still dying to get up to the King Arthur store after reading your post about visiting.

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  13. This looks absolutely delicious! I love fresh bread but really don't like making it. I pinned this recipe because it's a bread recipe that's right up my alley! Thanks!

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  14. Wonderful. My dad was a baker so I have spent a lot of time making bread the traditional way. But this seems like a must try. Like today.

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  15. Not sure if it was me but I just recently posted no-knead bread but the recipe came from Mother Earth News and I posted a link to it. I have been making this for awhile now and was flabbergasted at how good it was! Mother Earth News just published an article on making pizza from it so I need to try that. There are also books out on it but I haven't purchased any of those.
    I started making it simply because I have RA and couldn't do the kneading anymore and wasn't that pleased with bread maker bread. This was the answer to a prayer!
    Yours look beautiful!

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  16. I make no knead bread all the time! It's so great toasted with butter. Yum!

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  17. Your bread looks beautiful! I have tried a no knead bread recipe from the NY Times...I may try this recipe today. It does look like a $4 loaf from a bakery!
    annie

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  18. What a wonderful recipie. I'm like you, I want to make my own bread and in my case I feel inadequate every time I buy a loaf at the store.
    I'm inspired!
    xx
    julie

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  19. yum yum yum !!! i've not made no knead bread before, this looks great!! :)

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  20. Can't wait to try this - looks and sounds delicious, and perfect for my kneading aversion!

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  21. Yum! Nothing better than the smell of fresh baked bread in the house...

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  22. I am now wiping the drool off my keyboard! Beautiful. I could just take a bite :)

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  23. Is there anything finer than homemade bread? I think not. Your's looks delicious!

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  24. Oh that's looks so good, will have to give it a try. Love the smell of fresh bread.

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  25. That is pretty bread. I will have to try it. There just says something homey about fresh baked bread. I think that is a wonderful compliment too.
    My girls all bake their own bread every week. I always feel like a slacker because I don't. :)
    This might be nice and easy though. Have you ever tried Pioneer Woman's Rosemary rolls cooked in a black skillet? So good, I don't even like rosemary. She used frozen bread dough. I do enjoy making bread though, I wish I didn't like to eat it. :)

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  26. It is an absolutely gorgeous loaf of bread. I love baking bread. It seems time just slips away though. Thanks for sharing. Bonnie

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  27. What a fantastic job you did!! so beautiful and I can imagine how delicious your house smelled when it was cooking!
    Mary x

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  28. I remember the days of passing the sourdough starter around. My sister and I had the same starter going around for years. I have been thinking about that lately; this sounds easier and I think I'll give it a try. I enjoyed the Feta, Grapefruit salad and Masala is enjoying the P.B and Squash Bone "Cookies." Thank you for the recipes! Happy New Year. Peace.

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  29. Susan, this bread looks delicious!
    Have a nice week

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  30. Looks like artisan bread to me!!! Oh, it looks delicious too, I'll bet your home smelled wonderful!

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  31. I have to make some! Can you tell me how many grams or ounces makes one cup? :0)

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  32. Making bread and working full-time is no mean feet .. looks delicious!

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  33. Okay! You've convinced me! It does look amazing and boy, any bread that has a crusty outer shell and great air bubbles has got me sold! I'm making it ... and I love your idea of letting it sit longer to achieve a sour dough flavour! I hope you let us know how that works out!

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  34. Thank you for passing this on...I must try it!! Homemade bread is a treat around here...and this sounds like the best I have seen...and no sourdough starter to feed! Yippeeee!
    Nancy

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  35. I have been cooking for many years, but have always been intimidated by bread making. I think I might be able to do this one, I'm going to give it a try...it looks great!

    I am a new follower. Patsy

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  36. Oh goodness...I've written the recipe out and I hope to use it this weekend. Thanks for the recipe! Have a wonderful weekend.
    Maura :)

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  37. I can almost smell it. Looks delicious. Who knows, I may even try to make it myself ;-)

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  38. I should know by now not to come over here to visit you if I am the least me hungry. lol
    This bread looks so good. I can't believe you can make bread that turns out like this. OH my I am in awe of you
    Been missing your site so I need to catch up while I am lucky enough to be here
    Hope you have a great week
    Love
    Maggie

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  39. The lengthy instructions really do scare me off. But I love the idea of baking with only 4 ingredients! :) Wonderfully made! :)

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  40. Great ^_^ I love making bread, his fragrance that fills home. No-knead bread is very comfortable, yours is amazing. Nice to meet you, have a good Sunday

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